Technical Products and Services Inc. Technical Products and Services Inc.
Your Single Source of Fluid Handling Products Since 1981

145 State Highway 94, Blairstown, NJ 07825  p.908.362.9981   fax.908.362.5631
 

TWO BASIC DESIGNS OF FULL CONE NOZZLES

AXIAL   TANGENTIAL  
cutaway of axial full cone nozzle cutaway vaneless full cone nozzle
Liquid enters under pressure and is forced through a stationary turbine vane located inside the nozzle.  As the liquid leaves the orifice the droplets follow a trajectory influenced by the orifice shape and vane design.   The result is a consistent spray angle and uniform droplet distribution.   Droplet size and spray distribution  are very predictable and not dependant upon a laminar flow.  The "free passage" of axial full cones are determined by the largest particle size that can pass through the vane without getting stuck.   As a general rule, the free passage of an axial full cone nozzle is approximately 2/3 of the orifice diameter.  Liquid enters under pressure and is forced through an offset orifice and into a swirl chamber.  As the liquid leaves the orifice the droplets follow a trajectory influenced by the orifice shape and the swirl chamber design.  The result is a consistent spray angle and uniform droplet distribution.   Droplet size and spray distribution  are very predictable and not dependent upon a laminar flow.  The "free passage" of vaneless full cones are determined by the largest particle size that can pass through the incoming orifice.  Vaneless full cones provide the largest free passage that the capacity allows.
Example: An axial full cone nozzle flowing 6 GPM at 40 PSI with a 90 degree spray angle would have a 1/2" connection and a free passage size of 0.205".  Example: A vaneless full cone nozzle flowing 6 GPM at 40 PSI with a 90 degree spray angle would have a 1/2" connection and a free passage size of 0.308".